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Minisymposium Speakers (11:00am--)

The minisymposium will take place Sunday, June 1. The times and rooms are yet to be arranged.



Professor Jonathan M. Borwein,
Director, Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, B. C.

Title:

Doing Mathematics on the Web

Abstract

``Doing" intentionally captures both ``communicating and publishing" and ``thinking, calculating and computing". I will talk about some of the issues involved in publication over the internet and show some of the tools that CECM has developed and is developing for

This will be a live talk.



Sam Dooley
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
dooley@watson.ibm.com

Title:

Derivational Problem-Solving System for Elementary Linear Algebra

Abstract:

A primary obstacle in the application of computer algebra to mathematics instruction is the mismatch between the goals of the symbolic systems and the requirements of instructional settings. A derivational system for a domain of computation is a regime for organizing problem-solving facilities which allows a student to build competence in a collection of computational skills while providing a correct and consistent approach to informal symbolic reasoning. This talk presents a description of the components of a derivational system and discusses how these components realize an advantage over more conventional computer algebra systems in achieving the goals of mathematics instruction. A derivational system for elementary linear algebra is described to illustrate the approach to symbolic problem-solving which is presented by such a system.



Keith Geddes
Symbolic Computation Group
Department of Computer Science
University of Waterloo

Title:

Maple as a Tool for Scientific Computation

Abstract:

The Maple scientific computation environment supports both symbolic and numeric mathematical computation. This presentation explores the enhanced mathematical problem-solving capabilities which can be achieved via a hybrid symbolic-numeric approach in various problem areas. The objective is to achieve an appropriate combination of symbolic mathematical analysis and numerical computation.

Applications include the development of algorithms for efficient numerical evaluation of functions, the evaluation of definite integrals in the presence of singularities, and the generation of problem-specific numerical methods for solving differential equations. The hybrid approach will be seen to be particularly suited to the teaching of scientific computation.



David J. Jeffrey
Department of Applied Mathematics
University of Western Ontario
London, Canada
djj@apmaths.uwo.ca

Title: Mathematics for the Million:
Automating Mathematics Using Computers

Abstract:

Computer Algebra Systems (Derive, Maple and Mathematica) are now being used quite widely in educational contexts. For educators and students alike, the systems hold out the promise of increasing their effectiveness. By means of examples, and---I hope---demonstrations, I shall discuss some of the difficulties that the developers of Maple and Derive face in making their systems reliable tools for student use. The problems are not problems in programming, but rather are problems in mathematics and in the way people think of mathematics. The responsibilities for change and improvement lie not solely with the developers, but also with the mathematical and educational community. The mathematical level of the talk will mostly stay at the level of first-year mathematics.


next up previous
Next: About this document Up: Computers in Mathematics Education Previous: Plenary Speaker (9:00am)



Robert Corless
Fri May 2 12:23:10 EDT 1997